Kaiser Company, Swan Island

Tankers 1942 - 1945


Schenectady

Built: 12/42
Hull#: 1
USMC#: 793
Later Names:
1948 Diodato Tripcovich


History and Notes:
In January 1943 the one-day old T2 tanker SS Schenectady had just completed successful sea trials and returned to harbour in calm cool weather when . . . "Without warning and with a report which was heard for at least a mile, the deck and sides of the vessel fractured just aft of the bridge superstructure. The fracture extended almost instantaneously to the turn of the bilge port and starboard. The deck side shell, longitudinal bulkhead and bottom girders fractured. Only the bottom plating held. The vessel jack- knifed and the center portion rose so that no water entered. The bow and stern settled into the silt of the river bottom." The ship was successfully repaired. The Schenectady has provided innumerable Naval and Maritime Engineers with a serious object lesson in the catastrophic effects of Britle Fracture. The speed with which these ships were built and the remarkable histories of many continue to captivate engineers and non-engineers alike.

Source: Adam Ward of Newport News Shipbuilding via web feedback on 19 April 2006

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Quebec

Built: 2/43
Hull#: 2
USMC#: 794
Later Names:
1948 Maria Christina D.
1957 Mariacristina D.

History and Notes:

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Fort Moultrie

Built: 3/43
Hull#: 3
USMC#: 795
Later Names:
1956 Huntingdon
1963 Anna Demetrios
1963 Annademetrios
History and Notes:

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Fort Washington

Built: 3/43
Hull#: 4
USMC#: 796
Later Names:
1948 Conoco Denver
1956 Hunters Point
1961 Texaco Nebraska
1972 Sea Lord
History and Notes:

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Egg Harbor

Built: 4/43
Hull#: 5
USMC#: 797
Later Names:
1948 President Brand
1951 Valiente
1954 Kyanos
1959 President Reitz
History and Notes:
1960: MARATHON, 1967 MARATHONIAN

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Stony Point

Built: 4/43
Hull#: 6
USMC#: 798
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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New London

Built: 5/43
Hull#: 7
USMC#: 799
Later Names:
1956 Fugue


History and Notes:

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Brookfield

Built: 5/43
Hull#: 8
USMC#: 800
Later Names:
1948 William A.m. Burden
1961 Petronorte

History and Notes:

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Northfield

Built: 5/43
Hull#: 9
USMC#: 801
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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Hadley

Built: 5/43
Hull#: 10
USMC#: 802
Later Names:
1948 Alpha Limpopo
1948 San Julian

History and Notes:

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Fallen Timbers

Built: 5/43
Hull#: 11
USMC#: 803
Later Names:
1948 Buccinum
1951 Massiminociro D.

History and Notes:

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Pequot Hill

Built: 6/43
Hull#: 12
USMC#: 804
Later Names:
1948 Mormacfuel
1965 Cleveland

History and Notes:

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Fort Dearborn

Built: 6/43
Hull#: 13
USMC#: 805
Later Names:



History and Notes:
12th Mar.1947 broke in two in bad weather 800 miles NW from Honolulu on voyage San Francisco to Shanghai. Forepart shelled and sunk. Afterpart sold to Hilo Electric Light Co, Honolulu and used as electric power plant.

1952 Scrapped at Terminal Island.

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Queenstown Heights

Built: 6/43
Hull#: 14
USMC#: 806
Later Names:
1957 Prometheus


History and Notes:

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River Raisin

Built: 6/43
Hull#: 15
USMC#: 807
Later Names:
1948 Rosina Marron
1954 Aeolus
1957 Andros Sparrow
1959 Valiant Warhead
History and Notes:
1960: TRANSARCTIC

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Fort Meigs

Built: 7/43
Hull#: 16
USMC#: 808
Later Names:
1950 Seathunder
1959 Valiant Nikki

History and Notes:

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Fort Stephenson

Built: 7/43
Hull#: 17
USMC#: 809
Later Names:
1956 Westbury


History and Notes:
Scrapped in February 1962, Osaka, Japan.

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York

Built: 7/43
Hull#: 18
USMC#: 810
Later Names:
1948 Franca Fassio


History and Notes:

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Fort George

Built: 7/43
Hull#: 19
USMC#: 811
Later Names:
1956 World Truth
1961 World Conqueror
1967 Paulina
History and Notes:

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Sackett's Harbor

Built: 8/43
Hull#: 20
USMC#: 812
Later Names:
1957 Angelo Petri
1970 Californian
1975 Sea Chemist
History and Notes:
Sacketts Harbor suffered heavy weather damage on 1 March 1946 the fore section was sunk by gunfire as it presented a hasard. The stern was initially under towed but susequently completed the voyage by going astern under her own power to Adak in the Aleutian Island and then used as a power station for a while (a popular use for T2s especially by Norwegians) and then moved to Achorage Stern purchased circa 1955 by the California wine grower Angelo Petri and possibly managed by Joshua Hendy (also as the Californian)and new cargo section built by Todds on the USWC with stainless steel tanks with a new tonnage of circa 8,500 Hauled wine from California to New York returning with edible oils. Appears to have disappeared from the records by the early 70s.

Source: Provided by Peter Bareham via web feedback on 26 February 2006

Broken up Vinaroz January 1978.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Stony Creek

Built: 8/43
Hull#: 21
USMC#: 813
Later Names:
1957 Poseidon


History and Notes:

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Lundy's Lane

Built: 8/43
Hull#: 22
USMC#: 814
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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Fort Erie

Built: 8/43
Hull#: 23
USMC#: 815
Later Names:
1948 Serenissima


History and Notes:

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Plattsburg

Built: 8/43
Hull#: 24
USMC#: 816
Later Names:
1948 Andrea Costa


History and Notes:

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Lack Champlain

Built: 9/43
Hull#: 25
USMC#: 817
Later Names:
1943 Broad River
1948 Prometeo
1961 Omnium Wanderer
History and Notes:

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Bladensburg

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 26
USMC#: 818
Later Names:
1947 Esso Allentown
1963 Allentown Carrier
1963 Bladensburg
1967 Transsuperior
History and Notes:

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Fort Mchenry

Built: 9/43
Hull#: 27
USMC#: 819
Later Names:
1948 Kocaeli


History and Notes:

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Fort Sumter

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 28
USMC#: 820
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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Fort Henry

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 29
USMC#: 821
Later Names:
1948 Ponca City
1967 Seafarer
1972 Burmah Topaz
History and Notes:

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Fort Donelson

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 30
USMC#: 822
Later Names:
1948 Haligonian Lad
1949 Los Hermanos
1968 Niasca
1973 Lonado
History and Notes:
Hulked at Syros, Greece 1975.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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White Oak

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 31
USMC#: 823
Later Names:
1948 John Chandris


History and Notes:

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Mechanicsville

Built: 10/43
Hull#: 32
USMC#: 824
Later Names:
1948 Hallanger
1959 Asato
1961 Ally
1966 Victoria Faith
History and Notes:
1967: GRAND TRUST

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Champoeg

Built: 11/43
Hull#: 33
USMC#: 825
Later Names:
1956 World Tide
1963 World Champion
1965 Western Eagle
1963 Fuel Tide
History and Notes:

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Oregon Trail

Built: 11/43
Hull#: 34
USMC#: 826
Later Names:
1948 Herman F. Whiton
1950 Olympic Challenger
1956 Kyokuyo Maru No. 2
1974 Ocean Green
History and Notes:
1950: Lengthened and widened to 16433 GRT and converted to whale factory ship. 1974: converted to oil sludge processing vessel.

Broken up Masan 26 December 1975

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Corvallis

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 35
USMC#: 827
Later Names:
1948 Strombo
1961 Sirip Khorramshahr

History and Notes:

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Gervais

Built: 11/43
Hull#: 36
USMC#: 828
Later Names:
1956 World Theme
1962 World Marine
1965 Neddy
History and Notes:

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Umatilla

Built: 11/43
Hull#: 37
USMC#: 829
Later Names:
1956 World Thought
1960 World Campaigner
1966 Loretta
1967 Polly
History and Notes:

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Klamath Falls

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 38
USMC#: 830
Later Names:
1948 Petrakis Nomikos Iii
1955 Aetolicus
1956 Andros Vega
1962 Skyros
History and Notes:

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Yamhill

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 39
USMC#: 831
Later Names:
1956 World Thrift
1962 World Cheer
1966 Greta
History and Notes:

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Owyhee

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 40
USMC#: 832
Later Names:
1956 World Treaty
1961 World Charity
1966 Barbara
History and Notes:

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Table Rock

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 41
USMC#: 833
Later Names:
1948 Nivose
1962 Lake Winnipeg

History and Notes:
LAKE WINNIPEG, C.304310, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built in 1943 as a T2-SE-A1 Ocean Tanker by the Swan Island yard of the Kaiser Company Inc., Portland, OR as Hull #41. Launched November 28, 1943 as a) TABLE ROCK, US.244865, for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #833) and operated and managed by the Deconhil Shipping Co., San Francisco, CA. 523’6"loa, 503’lbp x 68’x 39’3"; 10,448 GRT, 6301 NRT, 16,600 dwt. Powered by a 7,240 shp G.E. steam turbine driving an electric generator/motor, with an output power of 6,000 shp to a single screw propeller. Turbine, generator and motor built in 1943 by the General Electric Co., Lynn, Mass. Steam was generated by two oil-fired Combustion Engineering Co. water tube boilers with a combined heating surface of 11,354 sq.ft. built in 1943. Rated service speed: 14.5 knots. The TABLE ROCK was part of an emergency tanker building program during World War II in which 481 T2-SE-A1 tankers were completed by four U.S. shipyards which were: Alabama Drydock & Shipbuilding, Mobile, AL (which built 102 ships), Kaiser Company's Swan Island yard which opened May, 1942 (147 ships), Marinship Corp., Sausalito, CA which opened March, 1942 (34 ships), and Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Chester, PA (198 ships). The T2s were built with nine cargo tanks with a capacity of 141,200 bbl., three hydraulic cargo pumps of 2,000 gpm each, a cruising range of 12,600 miles, a mid-ship pilot house and accommodations for a crew of approximately 44. Built at a cost of nearly $3 million which included $850,000 of defense equipment, the construction of these tankers averaged 82 days from keel laying to launching. The T2-SE-A1 nomenclature is defined as a Tanker (T), approximately 450 to 499 feet in length (2) at the waterline, steam powered Turbo-Electric engine (SE), and the first of the series (A1). The TABLE ROCK entered service in December, 1943. The TABLE ROCK was sold foreign to Cie. Nationale De. Nav., Rouen, France in 1948 and renamed b) NIVOSE. In 1961 the NIVOSE was purchased by the newly formed Nipigon Transport Ltd. (Carryore Ltd., mgr., Montreal, Que.) to carry Labrador ore upbound and grain downbound in the Seaway. The company was jointly owned by the Hanna Mining Co., Cleveland, OH and the Cargill Grain Co. Ltd. of Winnipeg, Man. The tanker was taken to Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland for the conversion to a bulk carrier. Her hull was cut away forward of her engine room leaving a 145 foot stern section which was joined to a new 585 foot long hull section, the keel of which was laid on July 13, 1961, built by the Barclay, Curle & Co. Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. The new hull had six cargo holds with 22 hatches, a hatch crane and a new forward pilothouse. The discarded tanker hull was towed by the tug SEEFALKE to be scrapped at Bilbao, Spain arriving there on May 28, 1961. The new bulker was launched on May 7, 1962 as c) LAKE WINNIPEG which was the last of the T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service. New dimensions: 730'loa, 712'lbp x 75'x 42'6"; 18,660 GRT, 13,012 NRT, 23,014 dwt, 1,022,000 bushel capacity. Her sea trials were conducted on August 19th. Her rated service speed was 13.5 knots (15.5 mph). The LAKE WINNIPEG was one of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service. The other six which are no longer in service were, by their final names and years of service on the Great Lakes; SHARON (1957-1986), RED WING (1960-1986), HILDA MARJANNE (1961-1983), NORTHERN VENTURE (1961-1983), LEON FALK, JR. (1961-1985), PAUL H. CARNAHAN (1961-1986). Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Îles, Que. on September 18, 1962 bound for Cleveland. On October 2nd she loaded her first grain cargo at the Canadian Lakehead bound for Baie Comeau, Que. Her first winter lay-up was at Prescott, Ont. in 1962-63. A KaMeWa bow thruster was installed at Lauzon, Que. during the Winter of 1963-64. Much of LAKE WINNIPEG's 1980 season was spent in the dry dock at Port Arthur, Ont. as a result of accidents at Duluth, MN and Detour, MI. The LAKE WINNIPEG's last year of operation was 1983 when she hauled only seven grain cargoes. In 1984 she was laid up at Montreal for the entire year. Because of her small capacity and high cost of operation, she was sold via Gibson Ship Brokers to Batista e Iramos Lda., Portugal early in 1985 for scrap. Her Canadian registry was closed on May 1, 1985 as "sold foreign." The next day she cleared Montreal in tow of the tug IRVING CEDAR bound for Sacavém, North of Lisbon, Portugal arriving there on May 19, 1985. LAKE WINNIPEG was the largest Canadian laker and the first Seaway sized ship, as of that date, to be scrapped. Nipigon Transport’s operations came to an end when the rest of the fleet was sold on March 27, 1986 to Algoma Central’s Marine Division at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

Source: http://www.mhsd.org/publications/a&f2/lkwin.htm

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Wallowa

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 42
USMC#: 834
Later Names:
1956 World Treasure
1959 World Challenger
1961 Globe Progress
1969 Overseas Progress
History and Notes:
Sold commercial (same name) 1947. Renamed WORLD TREASURE 1956. 1959, converted to bulk carrier. New midship section built by Harima SB & E Co., Aioi (measurements: 571 ft 9 in oa x 75 ft 3 in, 13,036 GRT, 22,755 DWT). Renamed WORLD CHALLENGER. 1961 renamed GLOBE PROGRESS. 1969 renamed OVERSEAS PROGRESS.

Source: Victory Ships and Tankers

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Grande Ronde

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 43
USMC#: 835
Later Names:
1948 Kate N. L.
1960 Hilda Marjanne

History and Notes:
The Hilda Marjanne was launched December 9th, 1943 as the type “T2-SE-A1” ocean tanker Grande Ronde for the U.S. Maritime Commission, being chartered to Los Angeles Tanker Operations, Inc., Los Angeles, CA for wartime service. Her dimensions at launch were 523’06” (159.56m) loa x 68’00” (20.73m) beam x 39’03” (11.96m) deep; 16,600 tons (16,866.66 tonnes) dwt; powered by a 7,240 s.h.p. GE steam turbine. She had 9 cargo tanks with a capacity of 141,200 barrels (16,836.76 cubic meters). This tanker served primarily in the Pacific Theater. Typical WWII defensive armament for this type of tanker included 1 - 5” (127mm), 4 - 3” (76.2mm), and 8 - 40mm anti-aircraft guns. The Grande Ronde was sold to Cephalonian Maritime Co., Athens, Greece in 1948 being renamed Kate N.L. The tanker was then engaged in carrying petroleum products on the Mediterranean Sea.

The Kate N.L. was sold to Leitch Transport Ltd., Toronto, ON (Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., managers) in 1960 being renamed Hilda Marjanne. She was towed to Hamburg, West Germany where she was converted to a straight deck bulk carrier and lengthened by Schlieker-Werft Shipyards with a new mid-body and bow. The keel was laid for this conversion on February 21st, 1961. The new bulk carrier’s dimensions were 730’05” (222.63m) loa x 75’00” (22.86m) beam x 39’03” (11.963m) deep; 25,600 tons (26,011.24 tonnes) dwt. The Hilda Marjanne crossed the Atlantic under her own power arriving at Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, ON August 10th, 1961 where she was refitted for Great Lakes service. She began this service November 2nd, 1961; her activities being focused in the grain and iron ore trades. The Hilda Marjanne’s tenure on the Great Lakes was only marred by 2 groundings. The first near Sarnia on April 10th, 1977 and the second on the St. Lawrence near Port Neuf on July 17th, 1979. The bulk carrier laid up at Hamilton, ON for a final time on June 13th, 1983 after completing her final laden voyage carrying cement from Clarkson, ON to Duluth, MN. After removing her forward cabins and cutting off her hull just forward of her engine room, the bow and midbody were towed from Hamilton to Port Weller Dry Docks to match with the stern of the Chimo. The stern of the Hilda Marjanne was scrapped at Port Maitland in late 1983.

The Canadian Ranger saw continued service after returning to the Upper Lakes fleet as a specialized self unloader. From 1993 until she laid up in Montreal on December 31st, 2000, the vessel sailed under the management of Seaway Bulk Carriers, Winnipeg, MB. The Canadian Ranger is currently owned by ULS Corp., a division of Upper Lakes Group, Inc., Toronto, ON operating now under the management of Seaway Marine Transport, St. Catharines, ON. The vessel remained in lay up statues until she was towed by the tugs Jerry Newbury and Bonnie B. III from Montreal arriving at Trois-Rivieres, QC November 2nd, 2002 to be used as a storage hull with her fleet mate Canadian Trader. The Canadian Ranger returned to active service November 24th, 2003 when she sailed from Trois-Rivieres to Toronto with a winter load of sugar.

On July 10th, 2004 the Canadian Ranger departed Toronto under her own power proceeding to Port Weller Dry Docks at St. Catharines, ON for a $2 million refurbishment and a 5-year survey. With the assistance of McKeil tugs Progress and Glenevis, the unique bulker emerged from the dry dock on October 6th, 2004 then proceeded upbound in the Welland Canal bound for Anderson's dock in Toledo, OH to load.

Source: http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/cdnrngr.htm

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Coquille

Built: 12/43
Hull#: 44
USMC#: 836
Later Names:
1948 Ampac Washington
1954 Mayflower
1955 Chemical Transporter
1966 Marine Chemical Transporter
History and Notes:

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Jacksonville

Built: 1/44
Hull#: 45
USMC#: 837
Later Names:



History and Notes:
At approximately 1530 hours on August 30th, 1944, the SS. JACKSONVILLE was torpedoed by U-482 in the North Channel entrance to the Irish sea. She was sailing in Convoy CU-36. JACKSONVILLE was part of a column made up of S.S. ERIN, MEMMON, CAPE NOME and CROWN POINT that had just turned away from the main convoy on the way to Loch Ewe, Scotland. The U-482, commanded by KL Hartmut Count Graf Matuschka, was waiting for just such an opportunity. U-482 fired two torpedos and both hit. The resulting explosion broke the tanker in half, killing approximately 77 men in her crew and the Armed Guard on board. One merchant seaman, Frank B. Hodges, and a member of the Armed Guard, Marcellus R. Wegs, survived, both seriously injured. Incidentially, the U-482 went on to sink the HMS HURST CASTLE and then SS FJORDHEIM, the SS EMPIRE HERITAGE and SS PINTO, the merchant ships coming from Convoys ONS-251 and HXF-305. In her trip from Norway to the UK and back, U-482 traveled 2,729 miles...all but 256 of that underwater using a snorkel. The U-482 was sunk early the following year in roughly the same area after being caught in a British minefield laid there after the U-482's first trip.

This information taken from deck logs of the escorts, the convoy escort and convoy commodore's reports, Armed Guard Reports,survivors reports, an interview with Frank B. Hodges, correspondence and interviews with seamen from other nearby ships, and the log of the U-482 among other sources.

Source: Provided by Mr. Theron P. Snell on 30 December 2005

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Meacham

Built: 1/44
Hull#: 46
USMC#: 838
Later Names:
1951 Custis Woods


History and Notes:

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Nehalem

Built: 2/44
Hull#: 47
USMC#: 839
Later Names:
1948 Gulfglow
1960 Emsfalke

History and Notes:

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Tillamook

Built: 2/44
Hull#: 48
USMC#: 840
Later Names:
1966 Colorado


History and Notes:
Completed in February 1944. 1948 - sold commercial (same name). Renamed Colorado 1966. December 1971, new 536ft fore and midbody fitted by Newport News SB & DD Co. (new measurements: 638ft 6in X 74ft, 16,650 GRT, 30,400 DWT). On 21 December 1971, the tug Palmer Gaillard suffered an engineroom fire while towing the new 384ft midbody section from Beaufort, SC to Norfolk, VA. Both vessels were adrift about 20 miles off Diamond Shoal Light, NC when the tug crew was rescued by helicopter. The new section was taken in tow by the Coast Guard before being turned over to commercial tugs for delivery to destination. The old fore and midbody sections were sold to German buyers for scrapping in April 1973.
Source: Victory Ships and Tankers

The SS Colorado has had her final voyage for Sabine Transportation. She delivered 10,000 MT bulk wheat to Massawa, Eritrea for the World Food Program in Rome. Afterwards she was delivered to her new owners. In honor of her service to Sabine Transportation, a brief history follows. The SS Colorado was a Victory Class vessel built to assist in the World War II war effort. Victory class vessels represent tanker ships called T2. The SS Colorado is classed as a tanker called T2-SE-A1. Tankers of this type were originally propelled by a turbo-electric drive. A steam turbine generator was connected to a propulsion motor to turn the propeller and this eliminated any need for large main reduction gear. This reduced the amount of time required to complete production and placed more ships into service for the war. The average production time for these vessels was 70 days. She was originally named the SS Tillamook and was one of 64 vessels built in 1944 by the Kaiser Company. She was built in the Swan Island Yard in Portland, Oregon. The SS Tillamook was originally 523 feet long, weighed 10,448 tons and her speed was about 15 knots. Her name was changed in 1966 to SS Colorado and in 1972 she was lengthened to 683 feet and now weighs 13,919 tons. Sabine Transportation acquired the SS Colorado on March 9, 1998 and for the last two years the SS Colorado has been hauling petroleum products for Koch Petroleum. We thank the SS Colorado for her 56 years of service.
Source:
Aaron Dutton
IT Systems Manager
Stickle Enterprises / Sabine Transportation
12 December 2000, by email

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Pendleton

Built: 2/44
Hull#: 49
USMC#: 841
Later Names:



History and Notes:
Broke in two in gale off Cape Cod 18 February 1952.

Description: tanker; steel
Dimensions: length - 504 ft. width - 68.2 ft. depth - 39.2 ft.
Tonnage: gross - 10448
Propulsion: electric, steam; single propeller
Machinery: 6000 horsepower motor
Cargo: 120000 barrels of number two fuel oil

The Shipwreck

Date Sunk: February 18, 1952
Cause: foundered
Location: Chatham, east side of Monomoy Island
Coordinates: latitude, 41o - 35' - 10"N longitude, 69o - 57' - 45"W
Loran: 13867.7 and 44914.0

Pendleton arrived off Boston late in the evening of February 17, 1952, five days out of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Progressively worsening weather delayed the tanker 2 days and now poor visibility and a rising gale convinced Captain John J. Fitzgerald to further delay his arrival. Setting a course of approximately 075o True, Pendleton stood off the shore at slow speed to await more favorable weather.

Conditions, however, deteriorated and by midnight an East-Northeasterly gale was blowing, attended by heavy snow and seas 60 to 70 feet in height. At 05:40 the next morning, the vessel took a heavy lurch accompanied by a loud explosive sound. Another lurch and a still louder sound racked Pendleton before the tanker broke in two between number seven and eight cargo holds, trapping eight men on the bow and thirty-three men on the stern.

Fireman Frank Fateaux, on watch in the boiler room, reported that a large wave hit the vessel. As it rolled from the impact, a second wave struck near amidships before the vessel split in two. Fred Brown of Portland, Maine, reported the noise was "like the tearing of a large piece of tin. It's a noise that sends shivers up and down the spine and jangles every nerve." Carol Kilgore, also of Portland, was awakened by the noise. Dressing hurriedly he ran up on deck as fast as he could. "When I got there", Kilgore said, "I couldn't believe my eyes. The bow was gone."

The tanker had been riding well for 15 hours before she broke. "She sort of raised up and trembled", said Chief Engineer Raymond L. Sybert, "There was a loud noise. I ran into the engine room and on the way down I heard a terrific noise like an explosion. The vessel rolled hard and there was a severe list to port." Sybert signaled all hands into the engine room and a crewman with a flashlight was sent to try to reach the bridge. He reported there was a gap of water and thought the ship had separated. Sybert stopped the engines and went to have a look, but couldn't see the bow. He then ordered all watertight doors closed, except those between the fire and engine rooms.

No distress signal was dispatched from the bow, where the radio room was located likely due to the fact that circuit breakers to the forward part of the ship kicked out at the time of the break. Capt. Fitzgerald was at the helm when the tanker split. "He was the best skipper anyone could want to work under. Whatever it was that happened, no one can blame Captain Fitzgerald," a crewman later stated.

With no way to communicate with the bridge, Chief Engineer Sybert took command. They were not in a sinking condition, the bulkheads were holding, they had power and the half-ship could be steered from an emergency rudder control in the stern. Sybert assigned watch details, which included lookouts at each end of the boat deck. With the vessel drifting in a southeasterly direction, the crew sighted the beach at about 2:00 PM.

Meanwhile, Coast Guard officials had their hands full. Earlier that day another T2 tanker, the Fort Mercer, broke in two thirty miles southeast of Chatham. Distress calls were dispatched and Coast Guard vessels conducted rescue operations. As it was a navigational hazard, Fort Mercer's bow was eventually sunk and the tanker's stern towed to Block Island. At approximately 2:55 PM, radar operators at the Chatham Lifeboat Station reported two objects on their screen. At 3:00PM a momentary improvement in visibility allowed lookouts at the Station to sight the bow of a tanker, the identity of which was still unknown. It wasn't until 4:00PM that an aircraft involved in rescue operations of the Fort Mercer, flew low enough to read Pendleton's name.

Aboard Pendleton, the crew listened to reports of the Fort Mercer rescue on a portable radio, but they weren't sure if anyone knew what was happening to them. As a result of this, and fearing his ship might breakup in the thundering surf, Chief Sybert opted not to try to run the tanker's stern aground on the outer Cape. Whenever the tanker came close to land, Sybert ordered the propeller turned slow astern, keeping his vessel offshore where seas were more moderate, thus protecting the vessels weakened bulkheads. At the Chatham Station, the Officer-in-Charge reported to the Search and Rescue Center that Pendleton was drifting rapidly to the southward and the situation on the stern section was critical. It was drifting directly for the Chatham bar, "where it would be in danger of capsizing with the loss of all on board".

Shortly before 6:00 PM, a thirty-six foot motor lifeboat CG-36500, under the command of Bernard C. Webber and manned by Andrew J. Fitzgerald, Edward B. Massey and Richard P. Livesey, departed the Chatham Lifeboat Station. Everything was fine until they hit Chatham Bar where the situation turned critical. "When we hit the bar I thought we smashed up," said Bernard Webber. "The other men were knocked to the deck time after time. I thought several times I had lost my whole crew. They looked like goner's but they managed to hold on."

Meanwhile, Chief Sybert ordered Pendleton's engines engaged in order to miss the bar. However, when Sybert learned from a radio news report that a motor lifeboat was on its way, the engines were secured to await rescue. "We waited all day for rescue," Frank Fateaux reported. "We hoped for the best but our spirits were pretty low until we saw a glorious sight. It was the light of a single light bobbing up and down in the rolling sea…we watched spellbound."

By little more than dead reckoning, his compass having gone overboard crossing the bar, Bernard C. Webber navigated his tiny lifeboat through 40-foot seas up to Pendleton's stern. Considered an extraordinary feat of seamanship in such conditions, the mission has gone down as one of the most heroic rescues in the annals of the United States Coast Guard. The four crewmen of CG-36500 were later awarded the Coast Guard's Gold Lifesaving Medal (comparable to the Congressional Medal of Honor) for their selfless heroism in the rescue of Pendleton's survivors.

Thirty-two of the tanker's thirty-three stern survivors were rescued, only the ship's cook, ordinary Seaman George C. Meyers perished. West Virginian George Meyers was no "ordinary" seaman. Weighing in at 350 pounds he was affectionately called "Tiny" by his friends.

It was like a watery battle zone as red flares, dropped from circling aircraft, illuminated the scene. A rope "Jacobs" ladder was hung down the starboard side of the stern. The crew could climb down the ladder, but had to jump the last few feet as the next to bottom rung was missing. Meyers helped hand down half of his shipmates to the waiting Coast Guard lifeboat before the last three, including him, were forced to jump. He got on the lifeboat, but fell off as a wave caught the craft. Several men tried to pull Meyers aboard, but were unsuccessful due to his excessive weight and the violent tossing of the boat. Soon thereafter, another wave caught the lifeboat and crushed Meyers against the tanker's hull.

Pendleton's stern continued to drift in a Southerly direction before grounding off Monomy. There were no survivors from the tanker's bow. One by one-mountainous seas swept them from the vessel as rescuers watched helplessly, unable to work in close to the vessel due to shallow water and high seas. In the early evening hours of February 18th, Pendleton's bow grounded on Pollack Rip Shoal.

Historical Background

Constructed: in 1944 at Portland, Oregon by the Kaiser Company, Swan Island Yard.
Construction details: T2-SE-A1 type tanker, commonly referred to as a T2 tanker, built on the longitudinal framing system with 9 cargo holds (Nos. 2 - 9 inclusive) being divided by two longitudinal bulkheads so that there were two wing tanks (port and starboard) and a center tank. Tank No.1 was divided in two by a centerline bulkhead.
Crew: 41 Master: Captain John J. Fitzgerald
Owners: National Bulk Carriers, Inc.
Boston Agents -- J.F. Moran Co., Milk St.
Home or Hailing Port:Wilmington, Delaware
Former Name(s) and date(s):
Official number:245142
Country: U.S.A.

Other Comments: Coast Guard records in Washington, D.C., reveal that of the 523 welded T2 type tankers built between 1943 - 1945, 10 were lost due to "shell fracture."
* January 9, 1952 - Last regular Coast Guard inspection in Jacksonville, Florida.
* January 1951 - A 3 way fracture was found in the bulkhead between #4 starboard and center tanks, which was not repaired.
* July 1951 - Grounded in the Hudson River. Aground for an entire day on the section between No. 6 and 9 tanks (where the vessel later broke).
* December 31, 1947 - Crack arresters were installed on deck (port and starboard) and on the bottom (port and starboard) and a further bilge keel modification was made. The latter modifications were in accordance with Maritime Commission Plan No. T2-SE-A1-S11-1.
* December 3, 1946 - Dry-docked at Mobile Alabama, the bilge keels were scalloped in way of the shell.

Salvage On the morning of February 24th, the salvage tug Curb owned by the Merritt-Chapman and Scott Corp., of New York, put a man aboard Pendleton's bow who reported finding the body of one man in the forecastle of the tanker. The man was later identified as Herman G. Gatlin, seaman. No other bodies were ever recovered.

Sources:
Boston Daily Globe; February 19,20, 1952
Fishable Wrecks and Rockpiles; Coleman & Soares 1989
Merchant Vessels of the United States; 1952
Shipwrecks Around Cape Cod; Quinn, 1973
The Fisherman, magazine; September 15, 1988
http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Campus/3415/t2tanker.html
United States Coast Guard, Marine Board Investigation; Sept. 25, 1952

Source: http://www.mass.gov/czm/ua-pendleton.htm

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Celilo

Built: 2/44
Hull#: 50
USMC#: 842
Later Names:
1956 World Trade
1960 World Citizen
1969 Eleanor
History and Notes:

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Crater Lake

Built: 3/44
Hull#: 51
USMC#: 843
Later Names:
1948 Montallegro


History and Notes:

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Newberg

Built: 3/44
Hull#: 52
USMC#: 844
Later Names:
1947 Esso Asheville
1960 Point Arena
1964 Rice Queen
History and Notes:

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Ochoco

Built: 3/44
Hull#: 53
USMC#: 845
Later Names:
1948 Esso Normandie


History and Notes:
ESSO NORMANDIE (I) (1948 - 1961) F.P.Z.C. T2-tanker 10443 g. 6300 n. 16850 d.; 159.56 oa-153.31pp x 20.74 x 11.96 meters (9.19 draught). Steam turbine connected to electric motor & screw shaft of 1486 MN (6000cv) by General Electric Co., Lynn, Mass. 16 knots. 03.1944 : completed by Kaiser Co. Inc. (53). Portland, Or. as OCHOCCO for U.S. War Shipping Administration. 1946 ; released to U.S. Maritime Commission. 1948 : purchased by French Government (Standard Franaise des Petroles), Le Havre and renamed ESSO NORMANDIE. 25.03.1961 : arrived at La Seyne for demolition.

Source: Provided by Mr. Auke Visser on 17 December 2005.

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Ranier

Built: 3/44
Hull#: 54
USMC#: 846
Later Names:
1948 Ardeshir
1954 Langeais
1959 Caribbean Wave
1962 Papadiamandis
History and Notes:

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Battle Rock

Built: 3/44
Hull#: 55
USMC#: 847
Later Names:
1963 Armor


History and Notes:

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The Dalles

Built: 4/44
Hull#: 56
USMC#: 848
Later Names:
1948 Junon


History and Notes:

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Glacier Park

Built: 4/44
Hull#: 57
USMC#: 1914
Later Names:
1948 Stanvac Durban
1962 Esso Chittagong
1964 Santa Helena
History and Notes:

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Grand Mesa

Built: 4/44
Hull#: 58
USMC#: 1915
Later Names:
1948 Stanvac Singapore
1962 Esso Singapore

History and Notes:

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Idaho Falls

Built: 4/44
Hull#: 59
USMC#: 1916
Later Names:
1957 Idaho Standard


History and Notes:
Idaho Falls T2-SE-A1 Build April 1944 by The Kaiser Company, Swan Island Yard, Portland, Oregon as "Idaho Falls" # 1916, for U.M.S.C. 1948 Same name, sold to Standard Oil Co., of California, USA. 1957 Renamed "Idaho Standard", Standard Oil Co., of California, USA. (Mngrs. Chevron Shipping Co.). Regarding to Lloyds Shipping Registers 1973/74, still in sevice, as "Idaho Standard", same company.

Source: Provided by Auke Visser via web feedback on 13 March 2006

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Silverpeak

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 60
USMC#: 1917
Later Names:
1957 Silver Hills
1959 Bulk Leader
1964 Sacramento
History and Notes:
Reboilered and re-engined May 1948 to steam turbine. Engine made 1942, boiler made 1945. 9/59 Converted to bulk carrier and renamed "BULK LEADER". New midship section added at Kure. Now 572' x 75', GRT 12,922, DWT 22,672.

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Elk Basin

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 61
USMC#: 1918
Later Names:
1948 Stanvac Bombay


History and Notes:
Scrapped in Keelung, April 1962.

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Coulee Dam

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 62
USMC#: 1919
Later Names:
1946 Shapur
1948 Fernand Gilabert

History and Notes:
T2-SE-A1 Build May 1944 by The Kaiser Company, Swan Island Yard, Portland, Oregon as "Coulee Dam" # 1919, for U.M.S.C. 1946 Released to U.S. Maritime Commission. 1947 Purchased by French Government (Association Ptrolire), Dunkirk and renamed "Shapur". 1948 Renamed "Fernand Gilabert". 1954 Owner restyled as St Maritime des Ptroles B.P. 13.09. 13.09.1958 When outward bound in ballast from Port de Bouc to Mena el Ahmadi, was off the coast of Oman when, in monsoon conditions of heavy seas , she went in collision, when light, with the full cargo Liberian tanker "Melika" (20551-"54). Fire broke out on both ships and seven members of "Fernand Gilabert" and fifteen of "Melika" were lost. The engines of "Melika" were not stopped and she steamed over twenty miles unmanned until the British frigate HMS Puma put a party on board. A salvage party from aircraft carrier HMS Bulwark got aboard "Fernand Gilabert" and after getting fire under control, the ship was taken in tow stern first. It was handed over later to HMS Loch Killisport who arrived at Karachi on 20.09.1958. Melika" was towed the same day at Muscat by HMS Bulwark. 07,01.1959 Arrived Bombay and laid up. 08.1959 : sold for breaking up to Vishwa Sehyog Dahrukhama.

Source: Provided by Auke Visser via web feedback on 16 January 2006

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Tuolumne Meadows

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 63
USMC#: 1920
Later Names:
1947 Trigonosemus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TRIGONOSEMUS, 1961 scrapped at Port Glasgow.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Camp Namanu

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 64
USMC#: 1921
Later Names:
1963 Ark


History and Notes:

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Wolf Creek

Built: 5/44
Hull#: 65
USMC#: 1922
Later Names:
1956 World Toil
1961 World Centurion
1965 Irene
1967 Tailee
History and Notes:

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Donner Lake

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 66
USMC#: 1923
Later Names:
1948 Minerve


History and Notes:
Scrapped 1964.

Source: Provided by Steve Czerwionka on 14 December 2005.

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Scotts Bluff

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 67
USMC#: 1924
Later Names:
1948 Orcher
1963 Patricia D.
1966 Lake Katrina
History and Notes:

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Tumacacori

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 68
USMC#: 1925
Later Names:
1948 Petros


History and Notes:

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Chalmette

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 69
USMC#: 1926
Later Names:
1948 Stanvac Brisbane
1951 Esso Lynchburg
1956 Lynchburg
1969 Marine Duval
History and Notes:
Delivered to the Maritime Commission, 19 June 1944 for charter to Pacific Tankers, San Francisco, CA. for operations. Sold to Standard-Vacuum Oil Co. in 1948 and renamed Stanvac Brisbane. Sold to Esso Standard Oil Co. of New York in 1951 and renamed Esso Lynchburg. Acquired by the Maritime Administration in 1955 and laid up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, James River, Fort Eustis, VA. Acquired by the Navy, 17 November 1956 and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) and placed in service as USNS Lynchburg (T-AO 154) for charter to Marine Transport Lines, New York City, N.Y. for operations. Placed out of service, struck from the Naval Register, and returned to the Maritime Administration for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, Beaumont, TX., 29 October 1957. (Source: http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/19154.htm)

Acquired by Marine Transport Lines in 1969 under terms of the Ship Exchange Act in exchange for traded-in ship Marine Collier (ex-Laconia Victory) on price-differential basis. Converted to molten supfur carrier in June 1969. New bow and midship sections (465ft 6in) by Bethlehem Steel Co., Baltimore (new measurements: 612ft oa x 80ft, 11,080GRT, 24,734DWT). Renamed Marine Duval. (Source: Victory Ships and Tankers)

"Marine News" of March 2003 reported the following: "MARINE DUVAL (ex-LYNCHBURG, ESSO LYNCHBURG, STANVAC BRISBANE, CHALMETTE), 15,008 tons, 1944, turbo-electric chemical-sulphur tanker. Sold by Marine Sulphur Shipping Co./Marine Transport Corp., USA, to Indian breakers and arrived Mumbai 20/11/02. She had been laid up at Galveston since 28/10/00."

2002-"Duva", Marine Sulphur Shipping Corp.( Marine Transport Corp.), USA. 2003 - Arrived at Alang, India on 14 January, 2003 for breaking up.

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Nickajack Trail

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 70
USMC#: 1927
Later Names:



History and Notes:
SS Nickajack Trail was wrecked in the entrance to Eniwetok Harbor on Japtan Island (on a trip from Port Arthur to Yokohama) on March 30, 1946. Her hulk was offered for sale in 1952 - There were no takers.

Source: http://www.aracnet.com/~pdxavets/wetokian/dunlap2.htm

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Shawnee Trail

Built: 6/44
Hull#: 71
USMC#: 1928
Later Names:
1944 Emba Ii
1949 Shawnee Trail

History and Notes:
Suamico Class Fleet Oiler: Laid down, 18 April 1944, as a Maritime Commission type (T2-SE-A1) tanker hull, under Maritime Commission contract, (MC hull 1928), at Kaiser Co., Inc., Portland, OR.; Launched, 31 May 1944; Delivered to the War Shipping Administration, 28 June 1944, for Lend-lease to the Soviet Union under the name Emba II; Returned to the Maritime Commission in 1948; Acquired by the Navy, 25 May 1948; Designated (AO-142), operated for the Navy Transportation Service by a civilian contractor; Transferred to MSTS, 1 October 1949, and placed in service as USNS Shawnee Trail (T-AO-142); Placed out of service, struck from the Naval Register, and transferred to the Maritime Administration,1 November 1972 for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, James River Group, Fort Eustis, VA.; Reacquired by MSTS, 20 January 1965 and placed in service; Placed out of service, struck from the Naval Register, and transferred to MARAD for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, James River Group, Fort Eustis, VA., 24 February 1972; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 10 August 1973, to Union Minerals & Alloys Corp., New York.

Source: http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/19142.htm

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Bandelier

Built: 7/44
Hull#: 72
USMC#: 1929
Later Names:
1947 Thelidomus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed THELIDOMUS, 1954 transferred to Dutch flag subsidiary, 1961 scrapped at Faslane.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Trailblazer

Built: 7/44
Hull#: 73
USMC#: 1930
Later Names:
1944 Kaptein Worsoe
1946 Trailbalzer
1948 Berry
1963 Hepta
History and Notes:
Returned to US in 1946 and renamed Trailblazer. Sold to France in 1948 and renamed Berry. Transferred to French Navy in 1961 on a long-term bareboat charter, refitted as a fleet replenishment ship. Returned to previous owners in March 1963. Sold in 1963 and renamed Hepta for voyage to shipbreakers, and arrived Hong Kong in June 1963 to be broken up.

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Fort Winnebago

Built: 7/44
Hull#: 74
USMC#: 1931
Later Names:
1947 Francine Clore
1952 Elisabetta D.

History and Notes:

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Forbes Road

Built: 7/44
Hull#: 75
USMC#: 1932
Later Names:
1947 Cleveland
1953 Enrico Insom
1959 Sterope
History and Notes:

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Fort Charlotte

Built: 7/44
Hull#: 76
USMC#: 1933
Later Names:
1955 Hess Trader
1977 Trader
1977 Aries
1980 Scorpio
History and Notes:
Completed 24 July 1944 by The Kaiser Company, Swan Island Yard, Portland, Oregon, hull number 76, for the U.S. War Shipping Administration, (Later the United States Maritime Commission), Portland, Oregon. U.S.M.C. No. 1933, O/N 246104. 16,613 DWT, 10,448 GRT. 523' 7" LOA, 68 2" Breadth, 29' 11" Summer Draught. Powered by 2 x steam turbines, (7,240 shp), manufactured by the General Electric Company, Lynn, Massachusetts, powering an electric generator connected to an electric motor driving a single screw shaft producing 7,000 shp @ 93 rpm, 15 knots.
1948 Sold to National Bulk Carriers, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware. (Daniel K. Ludwig, New York) retaining her original name.
1955 Sold to Hess Tankship Co., Wilmington, Delaware. (Hess, Inc., Perth Amboy, N.J.). Renamed Hess Trader.
1961 June, new cargo hull section built by Bethlehem Steel Co., Sparrows Point and fitted at Bethlehem Steel, Key Highway Yard, Baltimore (measurements: 605.0 LOA x 75ft 0 Breadth, 14,156 GRT, 23,393DWT). After part retained, including the original engines, vessel converted to all aft bridge and accommodation.
1977 Sold to Amherst Shipping, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware, (Avon SS. Co., Lake Success, N.Y. - Leo Berger, later Apex Marine Corp., same address) & renamed Trader. Later that year renamed Aries, same owner.
1980, 6 Feb., Damaged by engine room fire, at 24.40N-84.0W, while on passage Houston - Norfolk, Virginia carrying refined products. Towed into port on 11th Feb. Following inspection her underwriters declared her a CTL. Purchased from the insurers by Apex Marine Corp. and repaired. Renamed Scorpio on completion of her repairs.
1986 Broken up in Tuxpan, by Desguaces Metalicos y Relaminables; work began 15.07.1986.

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Chaco Canyon

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 77
USMC#: 1934
Later Names:
1947 Thallepus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed THALLEPUS, 1961 scrapped at Port Glasgow.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Pipe Spring

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 78
USMC#: 1935
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Athens


History and Notes:
Overseas Tankship (UK) Limited (OTUK), London

Scrapped 1963.

Source: Provided by Mr. Auke Visser on 21 December 2005

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Fort Matanzas

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 79
USMC#: 1936
Later Names:
1948 Trochiscus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TROCHISCUS, 1960 scrapped at Hong Kong.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Verendrye

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 80
USMC#: 1937
Later Names:
1948 Edenfield
1959 Northern Venture

History and Notes:

1947 purchased from USMC by Northern Petroleum Tank Steamship Co., Ltd (Hunting & Son, Ltd), Newcastle renamed EDENFIELD, 1959 sold to Northern Shipping Corp, Liberia renamed NORTHERN VENTURE, 1961 sold to Northern Shipping (Bahamas), Ltd and rebuilt as a bulk carrier. 1974 transferred to Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd, Toronto for Great Lakes use. 1983 lengthened by joining stern section of CABOT to bow and middle section of NORTHERN VENTURE and resulting ship named CANADIAN EXPLORER. 1998 Fore and midships section joined to after section of HAMILTON TRANSFER - resulting ship named CANADIAN TRANSFER (16,353 gross tons). 2003 still in service.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from Hunting & Son, Ltd by R. M. B. Hackman and Marine News

The Northern Venture was, in fact, the product of being combined with the stern of another vessel. This other vessel was the 1944 T2-SE-A1 class tanker a) Verendrye built for the U. S. Maritime Commission. Verendrye was built as hull #80 by Kaiser Co. Inc., Portland, OR (Swan Island yard) at an approximate cost of $3 million and was one of 147 such tankers constructed at this yard and one of 481 of this type of tanker built at different yards across America for the World War II effort. Launched July 15, 1944, the vessel's overall dimensions were: 523'06" loa x 68'02" beam x 39'02" depth, with a carrying capacity of 16,600 tons. Power was provided by a 7,240 s.h.p General Electric steam turbine driving an electric generator/motor with 6,000 s.h.p. output to a single screw propeller with the steam provided by 2 oil fired Combustion Engineering water tube boilers. After launch, the Verendrye was operated by Los Angeles Tanker Operators Inc., Los Angeles, CA and was chartered to the Canadian government for war service. In 1946, the vessel was chartered to American Pacific Steamship Co., Portland, OR. The year 1947 saw the tanker being sold to Eden Tankers Inc. (managed by Hunting & Sons Ltd.), Newcastle, England and renamed b) Edenfield.

The Edenfield sold to Leitch Transport Ltd. (managed by Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.), Toronto, ON in 1960 and was renamed c) Northern Venture. This tanker was 1 of 3 T2s purchased by Upper Lakes Shipping; the others being renamed c) Red Wing and c) Hilda Marjanne. The Northern Venture along with the Hilda Marjanne was towed to the Schlieker-Werft Shipyards, Hamburg, West Germany who had been contracted by Upper Lakes Shipping to convert the tankers to bulk carriers for Great Lakes service. Though not usual for a contract such as this being awarded to an overseas company, with the new St. Lawrence Seaway opening in 1959, all of the Canadian shipyards were already engaged in the building of new tonnage to take advantage of the much larger vessel dimensions now permitted to access the Seaway. The Northern Venture’s new keel was laid January 16, 1961 while her tanker hull forward of the engine room was removed and scrapped. The new hull was of traditional Great Lakes straight deck design with the forward wheelhouse and included 6 holds with 20 hatches. The Northern Venture's new overall dimensions were: 730'05" loa x 75'00" beam x 39'03" depth, with a carrying capacity of 24,825 tons.

On July 3, 1961; the Northern Venture arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks for a refit for Great Lakes service following crossing the Atlantic under her own power (following hull strengthening and the sealing of its hatches for the crossing). This crossing marked the first time that a vessel of this size built for Great Lakes and Seaway service had made the trans-Atlantic crossing under its own power. The Northern Venture sailed on its maiden voyage July 16, 1961 light to the Canadian lake head to load grain. The vessel's ownership had been transferred to Northern Shipping Ltd. (subsidiary of Upper Lakes Shipping) with managers being Island Shipping Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas. The odd registration was due to labor tensions being experienced by Upper Lakes Shipping in the 1960's. Ownership was transferred back to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1975.

The Northern Venture continued in regular service with Upper Lakes Shipping until being laid up in mid season of 1982 in Hamilton, ON. By early 1983, the forward cabins had been removed and the hull forward of the engine room bulkhead cut off with the stern being scrapped late in 1983 at Port Maitland, ON. On June 25, 1983; the forward section arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks to be joined with the stern of the Cabot. On October 29, 1983; the new diesel powered bulk carrier was christened Canadian Explorer with the formal Canadian registration on the Northern Venture being closed November 9, 1983.

Source: http://www.boatnerd.com/pictures/fleet/cantransfer.htm

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Castle Pinckney

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 81
USMC#: 1938
Later Names:
1947 Esso Everett
1957 Great Neck
1960 Texaco Southampton
1962 Anne Louise
History and Notes:

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Tonto

Built: 8/44
Hull#: 82
USMC#: 1939
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Bangkok


History and Notes:

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Grand Teton

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 83
USMC#: 1940
Later Names:
1948 Purfina
1951 Purfina France
1957 Purfina Portugal
1960 Fina Portugal
History and Notes:
1964: KERDOS, 1964: ARNO. Scrapped Bilbao, April, 1967.

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Beacon Rock

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 84
USMC#: 1941
Later Names:
1944 Donbass Iii


History and Notes:
This ship was leased to the Russians at the end of WWII. The Donbass III was wrecked in a storm but the stern half floated and was salvaged. Pacific Gas & Electric bought it and beached the half-ship permanently in Eureka and adapted the still-intact turbine to produce power for local distribution. The turbine was adapted again for use at the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR) (US AEC Power Reactor license No. 1) which first went critical on 3 August 1957. VBWR was shut down for the last time on 9 December 1963 after generating 40,400 net megawatthours of electricity to PG&E customers. VBWR is now an ASME Historic Landmark. This information is from: http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5654.pdf

Source: Provided by D. Farkas via web feedback on 21 March 2006

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Hovenweep

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 85
USMC#: 1942
Later Names:
1947 Oilfield
1959 Northern Eagle

History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Northern Petroleum Tank Steamship Co., Ltd (Hunting & Son, Ltd), Newcastle renamed OILFIELD, 1959 sold to Intercontinental Navigation Corp. & Transocean Freighters Corp, Liberia renamed NORTHERN EAGLE, 1962 rebuilt as a bulk carrier. 1976 laid up at Piraeus, 1978 scrapped at Split.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from Hunting & Son, Ltd by R. M. B. Hackman and Marine News

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Swan Island

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 86
USMC#: 1943
Later Names:
1947 Tomogerus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TOMOGERUS, September 1961 scrapped at Faslane.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Montezuma Castle

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 87
USMC#: 1944
Later Names:
1948 Esso Bretagne
1961 Faros
1974 Pyramid Viking
History and Notes:
ESSO BRETAGNE(l) (1948- I960) F.P.Z.B. T2-tanker 10448 g. 6301 n. 16810 d.; 159.56 oa-153.31 pp x 20.74 x 11.96 meters (9.20 draught). Steam turbine connected to electric motor & screw shaft by General Electric Co., Lynn, Mass. 16 knots. 09.1944 : completed by Kaiser Co. Inc. (87), Portland, Or., as MONTEZUMA CASTLE for U.S. War Shipping Administration. 1946 : released to U.S. Maritime Commission. 1948 ; purchased by French Government (Standard Fran^aise des Petroles), Le Havre and renamed ESSO BRETAGNE. 1952 : owner restyled as Esso-Standard SAF. 1960 : sold to Mace Shipping Co. SA, Liberia and renamed FAROS. 03.1961 : converted in a bulk carrier. New midship section built by Cockerill Ougree, Hoboken (15579 g. 22810 d.) 1974 : sold to Creole Shipping Ltd., Nassau, Bahamas and renamed PYRAMID VIKING. 08.1976 : laid up at Freeport. Bahamas. Prior to 14.12.1977 ; arrived at Brownsville, Tx. for demolition.

Source: Provided by Mr. Auke Visser on 17 December 2005.

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Smoky Hill

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 88
USMC#: 1945
Later Names:
1958 Mariposa


History and Notes:
7th Dec.1947 purchased from U.S. Maritime Comission by British Tanker Co, London. Dec.1957 sold to Mariblanca Navegaceon SA (Chandris), Piraeus, Greece renamed MARIPOSA. Nov.1964 sold for scrapping but went aground at Augusta on voyage Piraeus to Spain for demolition. Later refloated and voyage continued. Jul.1965 scrapped at Castellon.

Source: Provided by Ted Finch from \"The British Tankers\" by N. L. Middlemiss and also \"Lloyds Register\"

"In July/August 1957, I joined the s/s Smoky Hill in BP Llandarcy refinery, Swansea, South Wales U.K. as one of 2 apprentices (Brian Lawrence and myself) that had been transfered from the mv British Piper. At this time we had British Officers, petty officers and crew. In 1957 the vessel was some 13 years old and was one of some 6/8 T2s within the BP Tanker fleet. We sailed in ballast to Mena Al Ahmadi in Kuwait via the Suez canal where we loaded a full cargo, approx 16000 Tons, of crude oil bound for South America. We called into Capetown probably for bunkers and proceeded to La Plata in Argentina for full discharge. We were in La Plata for 5 days as we experienced some difficulties in discharging the balance of the cargo due to the number of holes in the shipboard main cargo pipeline which caused loss of suction on the main pumps and so we had to discharge what was left on the stripping pumps. Once away from port and into the river we received orders to "proceed Abadan, load full cargo for Isle of Grain". While crossing the South Atlantic we cleaned tanks for what appeared to be forever then tackled cleaning the fresh water tanks. We again bunkered in Capetown where we stayed for 48 hours while the engineers did some critical repairs to the deck steam lines. Steaming up towards the Gulf the mate decided that the remaining fresh water tank (2 of 2),that had not been done immediately following tank cleaning, needed cement washing. These large rectangular tanks were fitted beneath the midships accomodation alongside the dry stores provision cages. I can still recall crawling inside via the mud plate apperture with 1/2 a bucket of cement powder and a large 6" new paint brush. The cement was wetted with the fresh water laying in the lower sections of the tank. Mixed to a creamy paste and applied to the areas of bare steel work with the brush. I dont remember how may bags of cement we used in the complete process. With 2 apprentices inside it got very warm and humid!!! No wonder that we were both fit and slim!!! Arriving at the Shatt el Arab river pilot station we took on a Pilot and proceeded up river to Abadan (Persia). Loaded part cargo of crude oil and sailed down the "Shatt" to Fao (Iraq)to top up with more crude for Europe. Down the Gulf through the Straits of Hormuz, along the Saudi coast and then up the Red Sea to Suez. We traversed the Suez canal (south to north)into the "Med" through the Straits of Gibralter then ever northwards across the Bay of Biscay into the English Channel enjoying the "Channels" and the prospect of leave. Instead of Isle of Grain we were bound for the German port of Hamburg. In Hamburg we were in port alongside the oil jetty for 19 days as we endeavoured to discharge the cargo while reliving all of the problems that we had had in La Plata. The 1st Mate and the Chief Engineer aged during this time!!. Eventually it was necessary for the Chief,Second Engineer qand the Pumpman each accompanied by one of the two apprentices to don safety harnesses and Siebe Gorman helmets, fed by a flexible air hoses connected to foot pumps operated from the deck, to descend into the tanks armed with vulcanised rubber plugs and bronze hammers. The plugs were punched into the corrosion holes in the main pipeline to enable some semblance of suction to be achieved. In all about 6 of the 9 cargo tanks (centre and wing tanks)were "repaired" in this way. Todays Health & Safety Officers would be apoplextic! The work apparently did not proceed non stop as I do remember seeing a lot of the "attractions" in Hamburg at that time. We eventually left Hamburg and steamed down the River Elbe toward the UK, specifically North Shields on Tyneside, where once arrived we entered dry dock. Brian Lawrence and I paid off and went on leave. I never saw the vessel again. Forty nine years later I still think about the Smoky Hill as the 6 month+ experience was unforgetable. So different from the normal BP Tanker. The abiding image that amazed me was the sight of the flying bridge retaining bolts from the after section to the midships section moved 17" within the elongated bolt holes as the vessel flexed and worked in the South Atlantic weather. While it was said that these T2s had a limited life expectancy they were built to terrific standards and passed the test of time."

Source: Narrative provided by Ron Dunning via web feedback on 16 March 2006

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Fort William

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 89
USMC#: 1946
Later Names:
1948 Gulfwell
1957 Gulfpanther
1972 San Tome
History and Notes:

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Pioneer Valley

Built: 9/44
Hull#: 90
USMC#: 1947
Later Names:
1944 Krasnaia Armia
1949 Pioneer Valley

History and Notes:
Pioneer Valley, built as MC hull 1947 for U.S. Maritime Commission by Kaiser Corporation, Portland Ore., was laid down 27 July 1944; launched 6 September; sponsored by Mrs. Charles R. Clason; and delivered 4 October 1944 to the Soviet Union as part of the lend-lease Program. Serving in the Russian maritime service as the Krasnaia Armia, the oiler was returned to American custody at Hong Kong 26 February 1948. The ship was delivered to the U.S. Navy 30 April 1948, and was assigned to the Naval Transportation Service. With the formation of MSTS, control of the tanker passed to that command 1 October 1949.

The oiler was placed in the MARAD Reserve Fleet, Mobile, 18 March 1960 and remained inactive until 13 November 1961 when it was placed back in service with MSTS. Pioneer Valley was then operated by Marine Transport Lines tinder contract with MSTS, providing fuel to US and Allied Forces in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. Struck from the Naval Register, 15 August 1972; Transferred to MARAD, and then transferred to the Colombian Navy.

Source: http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/p7/pioneer_valley.htm and also http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/19140.htm

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Battle Mountain

Built: 10/44
Hull#: 91
USMC#: 1948
Later Names:
1959 Trinity


History and Notes:
Converted to steam turbine 1948, engines made 1943. 1959 lengthened to 545'x68'2"x29'11.75".

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Fort Wood

Built: 10/44
Hull#: 92
USMC#: 1949
Later Names:
1948 Zangueour
1959 Southern Eagle

History and Notes:

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Hood River

Built: 10/44
Hull#: 93
USMC#: 1950
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Cape Town


History and Notes:
1948 sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Kaohsiung August, 1968.

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Blacks Hills

Built: 10/44
Hull#: 94
USMC#: 1951
Later Names:
1948 Stanvac Hong Kong


History and Notes:
Scrapped Hirao, May 1962.

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Warrior Point

Built: 10/44
Hull#: 95
USMC#: 1952
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Cubu
1961 Cebu Maru
1963 Shunyo Maru No 1.
History and Notes:
1963: Converted to bulk sand carrier. Broken up Kaohsiung March 1970.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Pulpit Rock

Built: 11/44
Hull#: 96
USMC#: 1953
Later Names:
1948 Elia B.
1954 Elia Bibolini

History and Notes:
Scrapped Spezia, August 1962.

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Fort Clatsop

Built: 11/44
Hull#: 97
USMC#: 1954
Later Names:
1957 Oregon Standard


History and Notes:

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Laurel Hill

Built: 11/44
Hull#: 98
USMC#: 1955
Later Names:
1947 Tresus
1949 San Leopoldo

History and Notes:
Scrapped Inverkeithing, March 1961.

1947-1949 for Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co., London, renamed Tresus. 1949-1960 for Eagle Oil, renamed San Leopoldo. 1960-1961 to Shell Tankers (UK) Ltd.

Source: Provided by Steve Czerwionka on 14 December 2005.

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Mesa Verde

Built: 11/44
Hull#: 99
USMC#: 1956
Later Names:
1955 Villandry


History and Notes:
22nd Oct.1947 purchased from U.S. Maritime Comission by British Tanker Co, London. Feb.1955 transferred to BTC subsidiary Societe Maritime de Petroles BP, Paris renamed VILLANDRY. Jun.1961 scrapped at La Seyne.

Source: Provided by Ted Finch from "The British Tankers" by N. L. Middlemiss and also "Lloyds Register"

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W.l.r. Emmet

Built: 11/44
Hull#: 100
USMC#: 1957
Later Names:
1948 Agios Georgios V.


History and Notes:
1960: Bunker storage vessel at Pylos. Scrapped Spezia, September 1967.

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El Morro

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 101
USMC#: 1958
Later Names:



History and Notes:
1947: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Blyth, December 1959.

3rd Nov.1947 purchased from U.S. Maritime Comission by British Tanker Co, London. Nov.1959 scrapped at Blyth.

Source: Provided by Ted Finch from "The British Tankers" by N. L. Middlemiss and also "Lloyds Register"

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Casa Grande

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 102
USMC#: 1959
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Copenhagen


History and Notes:
1948: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Hirao, 5 September 1966.

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Pilot Butte

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 103
USMC#: 1960
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Durban


History and Notes:
1948: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Edjima, Japan December 1966.

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Bryce Canyon

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 110
USMC#: 2393
Later Names:
1947 Turbinellus
1949 San Leandro

History and Notes:
Scrapped Dalmuir, September 1961.

1947-1949 for Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co., London, renamed Turbinellus. 1949-1960 for Eagle Oil, renamed San Leonardo. 1960-1961 to Shell Tankers UK Limited. Scrapped September 1961, Dalmuir, Scotland.

Source: Provided by Steve Czerwionka on 14 December 2005.

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Cedar Breaks

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 111
USMC#: 2394
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Genoa
1968 Chevron Genoa

History and Notes:

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Pinnacles

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 112
USMC#: 2395
Later Names:
1961 Alchemist


History and Notes:

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Capitol Reef

Built: 12/44
Hull#: 113
USMC#: 2396
Later Names:
1948 Tomocyclus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TOMOCYCLUS, 1954 transferred to Dutch flag subsidiary. May 1961 scrapped at Dalmuir.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Joshua Tree

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 114
USMC#: 2397
Later Names:



History and Notes:
1947: sold commercial (same name) to National Bulk Carriers, Inc. 1948: re-engined with two steam turbines. Scrapped Hirao, July 1963.

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Platt Park

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 115
USMC#: 2398
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Gothenburg


History and Notes:
1948: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Kaohsiung, December 1967.

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Stones River

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 116
USMC#: 2399
Later Names:
1947 Tribulus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TRIBULUS, June 1961 scrapped at Faslane.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Fort Stanwix

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 117
USMC#: 2400
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Istanbul
1956 Caltex Nantes
1961 Electra
1967 Victoria Pride
History and Notes:
1967: GRAND PRIDE.

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Fort Frederica

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 118
USMC#: 2401
Later Names:



History and Notes:
1947: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Hong Kong, November 1959.

Feb.1946 aground on Goodwin Sands, near Dover on passage Trinidad to Hull, refloated. 6th Oct.1947 purchased from U.S. Maritime Comission by British Tanker Co, London. Jan.1959 sold for scrapping and Nov.1959 broken up at Hong Kong.

Source: Provided by Ted Finch from "The British Tankers" by N. L. Middlemiss and also "Lloyds Register"

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Saguaro

Built: 1/45
Hull#: 119
USMC#: 2402
Later Names:
1960 Edna N. Conway


History and Notes:

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Chisholm Trail

Built: 2/45
Hull#: 120
USMC#: 2403
Later Names:
1955 Montsoreau


History and Notes:
23rd Sep.1947 purchased from U.S. Maritime Comission by British Tanker Co, London. 1955 transferred to BTC subsidiary Societe Maritime de Petroles BP, Paris renamed MONTSOREAU. 6th Dec.1961 extensively damaged in collision in fog 12 miles North from Cape Spartel with French tanker ISIDORA while on voyage La Skhirra, Tunisia to Dunkirk and beached. 19th Dec.1961 refloated and towed to Port de Bouc. Feb.1962 scrapped at La Seyne.

Source: Provided by Ted Finch from "The British Tankers" by N. L. Middlemiss and also "Lloyds Register"

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Carlsbad

Built: 2/45
Hull#: 121
USMC#: 2404
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Johannesburg
1961 Nisseki Maru
1969 Beava
History and Notes:

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Fort Christina

Built: 2/45
Hull#: 122
USMC#: 2405
Later Names:
1951 Caltex Glasgow


History and Notes:
1948: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Hirao, August 1966.

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Sunset

Built: 2/45
Hull#: 123
USMC#: 2406
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Lisbon
1963 Toyosu Maru

History and Notes:

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Choctaw Trail

Built: 2/45
Hull#: 124
USMC#: 2407
Later Names:
152 Caltex Manila


History and Notes:
1948 sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Hirao, May 1966.

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White Sands

Built: 3/45
Hull#: 125
USMC#: 2408
Later Names:
1947 Thaumastus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed THAUMASTUS, December 1961 scrapped at Blyth.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Sullys Hill

Built: 3/45
Hull#: 126
USMC#: 2409
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Mozambique


History and Notes:
Sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Kaohsiung, December 1966.

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New Echota

Built: 3/45
Hull#: 127
USMC#: 2410
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Oslo


History and Notes:
1947: Sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Osaka, December 1960.

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Muir Woods

Built: 3/45
Hull#: 128
USMC#: 2411
Later Names:
1945 Elbrus
1948 Muir Woods

History and Notes:
Muir Woods, a T‑2 tanker built for U.S. Maritime Commission by Kaiser Corp., Portland, Oreg., was laid down 6 January 1945; launched 9 March 1945; sponsored by Mrs. George B. Peters; and delivered to the Soviet Union 22 March 1945 as part of the Lend‑Lease Program. The tanker served in the Russian maritime service under the name Elbruz until returned to U.S. custody at Trieste, Italy 20 February 1948.

The ship was operated by Marine Transport Lines under contract with the Maritime Commission. On 23 April 1948, she was acquired by the Navy, and was placed under control of Naval Transportation Service, designated as AO‑139. With the formation of MSTS, control of the tanker was transferred to that command 1 October 1949.

T‑AO‑139 continued to supply American overseas bases with fuel oil until 10 June 1959, when she was struck from the Navy list and transferred to the Maritime Administration Reserve Fleet, James River, Va.

Source: http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/m15/muir_woods.htm

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Big Bend

Built: 3/45
Hull#: 129
USMC#: 2412
Later Names:
1947 Oleum
1955 Big Bend
1957 Triton
1962 Southampton
History and Notes:
1963: COLUMBIA.

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Kings Canyon

Built: 4/45
Hull#: 130
USMC#: 2413
Later Names:
1951 Nissei Maru
1964 Shunyo Maru No 3.
1971 Sanjeevani
History and Notes:

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Salem Maritime

Built: 4/45
Hull#: 131
USMC#: 2414
Later Names:
1956 Gold Stream
1964 Penn Sailor
1971 Navigator
History and Notes:
Delivered April 1945. Sold into commercial service 1948, same name. Jan 17 1956: Exploded and caught fire while loading Lake Charles. Declared CTL and sold. November 1957: New midship section fitted by Maryland SB & DD Co., Baltimore, MD (Measurements: 552ft 6in x 75ft 4in, 12,584GRT, 20,305DWT) and renamed GOLD STREAM. 1964: Renamed PENN SAILOR. 1971: Renamed NAVIGATOR. June 1973, sold to Kaohsiung shipbreakers.

"On the night of 17 January 1956, the SALEM MARITIME had almost completed loading 150,000 barrels of petrol and kerosene at the Cities Service Oil Company's dock B in the Calcasieu River, 6 miles offshore Lake Charles, when she was wrecked by an explosion and subsequent fire. Adjoining loading stations were set afire and destroyed and the vessel, along with oil barges alongside, which had themselves exploded, was engulfed in flames.

For hours the inferno prevented fireboats from tackling the blaze, and the ship, her hull broken and buckled with amidships accomodations destroyed and poop accomodation gutted, became partially submerged as the sagging area of her No. 8 cargo tanks settled to the bottom.

Four days later the fire was finally extinguished. On 29 January salvors refloated the vessel from alongside the refinery wharf and removed her to an anchorage in the river, where she was laid up awaiting disposal. Here it was found that the ships propelling machinery was still in good order, having been virtually undamaged by the explosion, fire and extinguishing operations.

Nevertheless, the SALEM MARITIME was declared a CTL and was offered for sale in her damaged condition.Purchased by the Boston Metals Company, she arrived in Baltimore for inspection and repair on 1 May and later moved to Maryland SB & DD Company for the fitting of a new midship section."

Source: Victory Ships and Tankers, L. A. Sawyer and W. H. Mitchell.

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Fort Lane

Built: 4/45
Hull#: 132
USMC#: 2415
Later Names:
1957 Esso Nassau
1958 Esso La Salina
1962 Esso Cristobal
1962 Phoinix
History and Notes:
1963: PHOINIX I. 1948: sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Kaohsiung, August 1965.

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Bradford Island

Built: 4/45
Hull#: 133
USMC#: 2416
Later Names:
1979 Concho
1998 Hmi Trader

History and Notes:
Sold commercial, same name, 1948. Forward and cargo section was built in 1970 by Bethlehem Steel Corp., Beaumont, Texas. New measurements: 619ft6in x 84ft, 18,681GRT, 33,000DWT.

Source: Victory Ships and Tankers

HMI Trader was a part of the Sabine fleet from 1979-1998 as the S.S. Concho, and before that she was the S.S. Bradford Island, owned by City Services (Citgo).
Source:
Mike Thomas
Port Captain
Seabulk Towing Services, Inc.
7 July 2005, by email

Scrapped, 2000.
Source:
Fred Skidgell
C/E Seabulk Mariner
6 March 2005, by email

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Homestead

Built: 5/45
Hull#: 134
USMC#: 2417
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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Fort Raleigh

Built: 5/45
Hull#: 135
USMC#: 2418
Later Names:
1947 Thalamus


History and Notes:
Scrapped Blyth, June 1961.

1947-1961 to Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co., London, renamed Thalamus

Source: Provided by Steve Czerwionka on 14 December 2005.

1961 transferred to Shell de Venezuela, scrapped same year at Blyth.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Modoc Point

Built: 5/45
Hull#: 136
USMC#: 2419
Later Names:
1947 Theodoxus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed THEODOXUS, June 1962 scrapped at Faslane.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Chemawa

Built: 6/45
Hull#: 137
USMC#: 2420
Later Names:
1960 Barbara Jane Conway


History and Notes:
1960: Lengthened and widened to 14424 GRT. Broken up Bilbao 8 December 1974.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Grants Pass

Built: 6/45
Hull#: 138
USMC#: 2421
Later Names:
1956 Esso Ponce
1961 Rion
1962 Drepanon
1969 Pactrader
History and Notes:

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Steens Mountain

Built: 6/45
Hull#: 139
USMC#: 2422
Later Names:
1960 Mary Ellen Conway


History and Notes:
Sold commercial (same name) 1947. August 1960 new fore and midship sections built by Schlieker Werft, Hamburg (measurements: 575 ft os x 78 ft 6 in, 14,456 GRT, 23,573 DWT). Renamed MARY ELLEN CONWAY. 13 March 1972 was severely damaged by fire while discharging at Manzanillo, Mexico. Abandoned and towed from quay by port tug ESCORPION, which also caught fire. Vessel cast adrift in harbor, then grounded, still afire. Later refloated by Mexican Navy tug, fires extinguished and ship anchored Manzanillo Bay. Repairs uneconomic. Sold for scrapping. December 1972 arrived Kaohsiung in tow for scrapping.

Source: Victory Ships and Tankers

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Council Crest

Built: 7/45
Hull#: 140
USMC#: 2423
Later Names:
1947 Trochurus


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed TROCHURUS, March 1962 scrapped at Port Glasgow.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Government Camp

Built: 7/45
Hull#: 141
USMC#: 2424
Later Names:
1958 Captain Nicholas Sitinas
1962 Bridgehampton
1965 Platte
History and Notes:

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Multnomah

Built: 7/45
Hull#: 142
USMC#: 2425
Later Names:
1947 Esso Worcester
1961 Hess Refiner
1976 Pisces
History and Notes:

Completed as Multnomah by The Kaiser Company, Swan Island Yard, Portland, Oregon, Yard No. 142, for the U.S.M.C. completed July 1945, U.M.S.C No. 2425, O/N 248244.
1947 Sold to Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey), Wilmington, Del. And renamed Esso Worcester.
1950 Owner restyled Esso Shipping Company, Wilmington, Del.
1960 Transferred to Humble Oil & Refining Co., Wilmington, Del.
1961 Sold to Hess Tankship Co., Wilmington, Del. [Hess Oil & Chemical Corp.] Renamed Hess Refiner.
1962 Jumboised as her sisters by Bethlehem Steel Co., SB. Div., Sparrow's Point, Md., fitted by Bethlehem, Key Highway Yard, Baltimore, resulting vessel 14,211 GRT, 6050 x 75 0 delivered 03/1962.
1976 Sold to Bolton Shipping Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del. [Apex M.C. (Leo Berger), Lake Success, N.Y.] Renamed Pisces.
1984 Broken up at Kaohsiung by Shyeh Sheng Fuat Steel & Iron Works, Ltd. w.c. 14.09.1984.

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Grays Harbor

Built: 7/45
Hull#: 143
USMC#: 2426
Later Names:
1952 Caltex Rhodesia
1961 Rhodesia Maru
1964 Shunyo Maru No 2.
History and Notes:

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Halls Of Montezuma

Built: 8/45
Hull#: 144
USMC#: 2427
Later Names:
1947 Esso Cardiff
1955 Aquitanius
1955 Andros Neptune
1960 Skopelos
History and Notes:
1960: TRANSWARREN, 1962: NIAGARA.

Lost 400 square feet of plating in the Atlantic on 28/1/1965, IJmuiden for Nassau. Temporary repairs at Ponta Delgada, dry-docked at Marseille. CTL, broken up at Castellon, arrived 29 October 1965.

Source: http://riversea.tugtalk.co.uk/tugs/abeilleno26tonghai.htm

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Silver Creek

Built: 8/45
Hull#: 145
USMC#: 2428
Later Names:
1947 Theobaldius


History and Notes:
1947 purchased from USMC by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London renamed THEOBALDIUS, 1954 transferred to Dutch flag subsidiary, March 1962 scrapped at Faslane.

Source: Provided by Mr. Ted Finch on 18 December 2005 from The Anglo-Saxon / Shell Tankers by N. L. Middlemiss and Lloyds Register

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Glenn's Ferry

Built: 9/45
Hull#: 146
USMC#: 2429
Later Names:



History and Notes:

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Cannon Beach

Built: 9/45
Hull#: 147
USMC#: 2430
Later Names:
1960 Carolyn E. Conway


History and Notes:

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Jordan Valley

Built: 9/45
Hull#: 148
USMC#: 2720
Later Names:
1946 Lompoc


History and Notes:
SS Jordan Valley was a T2-SE-A1 class tanker constructed and completed September 22, 1945 as hull number 2720 (according to the USMC). Its DWT was 16,765 with a gross of 10,448 tons. Its vessel number was 248653 with a Marad number of 1077564. T2 Tanker Built by The Kaiser Company Swan Island Yard, Portland Oregon Name Built Hull # USMC# Additional Names JORDAN VALLEY 9/45 148 2720 1946 LOMPOC It was delivered to Deconhill Shipping Company in Portland Oregon upon completion and sold to Union Oil Company of California on October 2, 1946 and delivered in Los Angeles, Calif. It was then renamed SS Lompoc on November 18, 1946. The Lompoc and the steam tanker Victor H. Kelly were at the Union Oil Company dock at Oleum, California on July 12, 1952 when a fire started at a leaking pipe on the pier as both vessels were discharging crude oil after a voyage to Los Angeles. The fire spread swiftly to the Victor H. Kelly, which exploded, and thence to the Lompoc. Flames raced through the docks and turned the whole area into a holocaust. The Victor H. Kelly became a raging inferno of fierce flames and billowing smock and sank alongside the remains of the wharf. Flames and explosions did less damage to the Lompoc and she was towed out into San Pablo Bay where she lay listing and afire. Later, her fires were subdued and extinguished and she was subsequently repaired by Todd Shipyards and returned to service. It is interesting to note that the Victor H. Kelley was previously owned by the Lompocs owners Union Oil Company of California- and had been sold by them in only the previous year to Peninsula Carriers Corporation of New York and then chartered back to Union Oil Company on a bareboat basis. The Lompoc again made news in 1964 when she became the first deep draught tanker to enter the Alaskan port of Anchorage in winter. She lay over at Kodiak while the Sea Land Container ship (Anchorage) made history by becoming the first large vessel to batter its way unaided through the heavy winter ice of Cook Inlet to reach the port after which she was named. The Lompoc berthed as the Sea-Land ship departed. There was a history of sales and resales of the ship through its history. It was sold to Cienega Tanker Corp. in March 1953, sold to Western Ocean Transport Co. in April 1956, sold to Security First National Bank in June 1966 (noted as being renamed at that time Security Pacific National Bank), and then sold back to Union Oil Company of California on December 20, 1973 for a sales price of $1,924,065. It was then sold again to American Gulf V on October 3, 1985 and supposedly renamed SS American Gulf V before apparently being converted to a barge-hopper in 1987.

Source: Ed Talbot on August 16, 2006

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Fort Hoskins

Built: 10/45
Hull#: 149
USMC#: 2721
Later Names:
1978 Red River
1984 River

History and Notes:
1961: Lengthened and widened to 15221 GRT. Broken up Kaohsiung 23 August 1984.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Snake River

Built: 10/45
Hull#: 150
USMC#: 2722
Later Names:
1947 John Flanigan
1951 Olympic Mariner
1964 Mariner
History and Notes:
Scrapped Kaohsiung, April 1969.

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Victory Loan

Built: 10/45
Hull#: 151
USMC#: 2723
Later Names:
1951 Caltex Melbourne
1967 Texaco Melbourne

History and Notes:
1967: Lengthened and widened to 13899 GRT. Broken up Porto Alegre 14 November 1985.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Coxcomb Hill

Built: 11/45
Hull#: 152
USMC#: 2724
Later Names:
1951 David E. Day


History and Notes:
1958: Lengthened and widened to 12228 GRT. Broken up Brownsville 31 May 1976.

Source: Miramar Ship Index

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Bent's Fort

Built: 11/45
Hull#: 153
USMC#: 2725
Later Names:
1963 Transhudson


History and Notes:
1948: Sold commercial (same name). Scrapped Valencia, September 1970.

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